WOMEN’S FOOTBALL: AN EMERGING (ENTERTAINMENT) INDUSTRY

Last month, representatives of FIFPRO, the Asociación de Futbolistas Españoles (AFE), Sky and public policy makers from across Europe met, at the Burson-Cohn and Wolfe offices in Brussels, to discuss key issues and developments in professional women’s football.

The aim of the event was to enhance knowledge and raise awareness of new forces and opportunities that are transforming the women’s football industry. Taking into account the most recent success of the Women’s World Cup and unprecedented momentum currently being experienced, broadcast experts stressed best practices and addressed the increasing value of women’s football properties.

“There is a growing number of female players, more spectators in the stadiums and wider TV audiences, which in turns means a growing potential to generate value”

— by Pilar del Castillo - MEP

The Member of the European Parliament and former Spanish Minister for Sport and Education, Pilar del Castillo, described the evolution of women’s football and stated that “ there is a growing number of female players, more spectators in the stadiums and wider TV audiences, which in turns means a growing potential to generate value”. In addition, Pilar del Castillo emphasized the role of public institutions and said that “As part of the ecosystem where women’s football industry operates, public institutions, and in particular the European Parliament, have to contribute to a medium and long-term strategy. More specifically by: promoting initiatives that give visibility to the efforts of female players, support the improvement of working conditions and fighting discrimination wherever it might be".

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“Public institutions can support the activism by the players and ensure that their voices are carried through to the corridors of power.”

— by former professional football player and AFE representative Cristina Vega Leandro

Amanda Vandervort, FIFPRO’s Chief Women Football Officer, stressed that “Industry growth without consideration of labour conditions will have negative consequences on the long-term viability of women’s football. Therefore, we have a tremendous opportunity in this relatively nascent stage of global growth in women’s football to ensure fair, equitable, and sustainable growth through effective policies, adequate regulation and investment.”

“Industry growth without consideration of labour conditions will have negative consequences on the long-term viability of women’s football”

— by Amanda Vandervort - FIFPRO’s Chief Women Football Officer

“As female stars become more visible and speak more loudly for change football stakeholders and public institutions like the European Parliament should carefully listen to those who make the game.”

— by Tomasz Frankowski - Member of the European Parliament
In addition, a Q&A session with remarks by UEFA and La Liga facilitated a discussion on recent developments and initiatives within the game.

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